Twitter
RSS
Facebook

Abyssinian Maritim

Abyssinian Maritim

Abyssinian Maritim

Abyssinian Maritim (Vuga Roundabout, Stone Town, Zanzibar City) – located in the center of Stone Town, this restaurant serves mainly Ethiopian dishes and won accolades on TripAdvisor.com. With its interior décor celebrating Ethiopian culture, patrons can sample cuisine from that East African country, as well as its celebrated coffee. First-time visitors can walk in and order Tibs (grilled meat), Injera (Ethiopian flatbread, and Tej (honey beer).

 


CAR RENTALS

CAR RENTALS

CAR RENTALS

CAR RENTALS – the following car rental agencies operate in Zanzibar:

 

First Car Rental Zanzibar: +255 677 451 118
Kibabu Cars Zanzibar: +255 772 755 788
Ola Zanzibar Car Rental: +255 777 415 321
Rafiki Zanzibar Car Rental: +255 711 326 587
Zanzibar Car Hire Ltd.: +255 777 424 858
Zanzibar Rent a Car: +255 713 676 033

 


Dr. Livingstone’s House

Dr. Livingstone’s House

Dr. Livingstone’s House

Dr. Livingstone’s House (Malawi Road, Zanzibar) — this building is named for the well-known and respected missionary-cum-explorer, Dr. David Livingstone, who used it as a base for his wanderings. During the second half of the 19th century, several other European missionaries and explorers, such as Burton and Speke, used it as the starting point for their expeditions to the interior of Africa. Most of houses were built during the 19th century, when Zanzibar became the trading center of East Africa. The majority of the old buildings in the Stone Town are used as residential flats on the upper floors and business premises on the ground floors. Some of these buildings have been converted or utilized as modern tourist hotels and restaurants.

 

Bwejuu

Bwejuu

Bwejuu

Bwejuu (beach) – this beach is located on the east coast of Zanzibar island (just north of the town of Paje). Because this beach acts more as a fishing village, swimming is not a major activity here. Still, it’s a picturesque, quiet beach, with resorts like Breezes within walking distance.

SHOPPING

SHOPPING

SHOPPING

SHOPPING

As expected for this destination, shopping options are limited and do not include trendy, roomy, air-conditioned modern shopping malls (as found elsewhere). Instead, Zanzibar thrives on the sale of traditional merchandise (ranging from African garments, to fine wood carvings, art works, brassware and other souvenir-type goods). On that note, Stone Town is filled with such shopping options. The shopping areas to visit are along Kiponda Street (mainly textiles and jewelry), Market Street (textiles and jewelry), Malindi Street (textiles, cosmetics) Darajani Street (almost everything) and Mchangani Street (mainly hardware).

The Zanzibar Shopping Centre located along Hurumzi Street, for example, is a good source of brightly-colored folk art featuring mainly animal and bird designs. Here, you can commission a painted name plaque for a child’s room to your own design, or walk home with oil paintings of different sizes. The Gallerama Mall on Kenyatta Road has a branch of the Kenyan chain, African Heritage, packed with superior crafts from all over the continent including stunning bark lampshades sprinkled with cowrie-shells and brightly-colored beads in starburst patterns, mahogany-framed mirrors striped with porcupine quills and black soapstone box with a hornbill’s head handle.

The upmarket Tanzanite Jewelers in the Old Fort feature designs made with milky-blue Tanzanite gemstones while Muafaka Boutique, located opposite the Tembo Hotel along Shangani Street designs and produces rolls of batik cloth in peacock colors. You can also pick beachwear in natural fabrics and colors, Kenyan kikoi sarongs, Kenyan “Kiboko” label, cream-colored women’s shorts in a cotton/linen mi, stripy woven shoulder bags at One-Way boutique along Kenyatta Road.

6 Degrees South Grill and Wine Bar

6 Degrees South Grill and Wine Bar

6 Degrees South Grill and Wine Bar

6 Degrees South Grill and Wine Bar (Plot 60, Waterfront, Shangani Street, Stone Town, Zanzibar City) – this is a popular hangout spot during the early evenings, when patrons order drinks at its rooftop bar and watch the sunset. DJs are usually on hand to play House and Ibiza-style “chillout” music. Many visitors say this is a “must see” destination in Zanzibar.

 

Hamamni Persian Baths

Hamamni Persian Baths

Hamamni Persian Baths

Hamamni Persian Baths (Soko Ya Mohogo, Stone Town, Zanzibar) – built by Sultan Said Barghash in the last 19th century, these were the first public baths in existence in Zanzibar. Although they are no longer functioning, the Persian Baths are maintained in near-perfect condition. To go inside the baths, one must ask the caretaker, living opposite, to unlock the gate; there is a nominal entrance fee, which goes towards the upkeep of the building. Explanatory plaques are situated at salient points around the baths and chambers. Admission: TSH 10,000 per person.

About Zanzibar

Zanzibar

Zanzibar

Zanzibar (a semi-autonomous part of the East African nation of Tanzania) consists of two large islands (Zanzibar — a.k.a. Unguja, and Pemba) along with a chain of smaller ones. It was a trading base for Middle East traders going as far back as the Persians (who reputedly built the first mosques in East Africa). By the time the first European explorers (the Portuguese) made their way to East Africa in the late 1400s, Zanzibar was long established as a trading center by Arabs

Zanzibar became part of the Portuguese empire in the early 1500s and remained so for nearly two centuries. In 1698, Zanzibar fell under the control of the Sultanate of Oman. In 1832, Oman’s ruler moved the capital of his country from Muscat (that country’s main city in the Arabian Peninsula) to Zanzibar. Under the Sultans’ rule, Zanzibar’s role in the East African coastal economy became well-established, complete with a robust trade in cash crops, ivory, and spices (which helped Zanzibar and nearby islands gain the nickname the “Spice Islands”). Slaves were also being traded (despite slavery being abolished in other parts of the world by the late 19th century, such as the Americas).

In 1890, Zanzibar became a protectorate of Britain. However, the death of pro-British Sultan Hamad bin Thuwaini in August 1896 (replaced by an anti-British sultan) led to the “Anglo-Zanzibar War” – the shortest war in history (lasting just 38 minutes). That British victory foreshadowed that country’s colonial rule over those islands (and nearby Tanganyika after World War I, when the Germans gave up possession of that country to Britain). Zanzibar became independent from Britain in 1963 (two years after Tanzania – then known as Tanganyika, was granted its independence from the UK). A year later, Zanzibar officially became part of Tanzania in a political union encouraged by Tanzanian politician Julius Nyerere (that country’s leading pro-independence leader).

Along with agriculture (consisting mainly of clove exports) and other forms of trade, tourism has become a major part of Zanzibar’s economy. Its location in the Indian Ocean attracts tourists from Europe and elsewhere (including cruise ship traffic). As much as 27% of Zanzibar’s GDP is from tourism (generating as much as 70% of its foreign currency earnings). Along with these islands’ beaches, their rich cultural history is another draw for travelers. Zanzibar is also proximate to other Indian Ocean destinations such as the Seychelle Islands, Mauritius, Madagascar and Mombasa (Kenya).